CX and you

A good CX is what makes a customer happy, and an outstanding CX will make him come back. An out-of-this-world CX will get him to bring his friends and family to your doorstep.

A good CX is what makes a customer happy, and an outstanding CX will make him come back. An out-of-this-world CX will get him to bring his friends and family to your doorstep.

Keeping the customer in the center of attention

Isn’t the most natural thing for many people to do, especially when believing that the reason you are working for is money.

But what if I told you that the most important reason is actually making your customers feel good about your relationship?

What exactly does CX stand for?

CX is the abbreviation for Customer Experience, but these two letters actually hold a very immense story behind them.

Neil Patel, in his article With True Love Comes Revenue: How to Make Customers Fall in Love with You talks about a very interesting fact:

81% of companies who provide great customer experiences and service do much better than their competitors, according to the 2009 “Customer Experience Maturity Monitor” report from the Peppers & Rogers Group.

What I love about his article is that he doesn’t sell you the usual schtick about how to make your customer happy by bending backwards so that he will tell everybody about his amazing experience.

What he does talk about is what aspects of your strategy and the various touch-points with the customer, are to be noticed, analysed and monitored in order to supply the best service you can. Whether before, during or after the sale, the customer has to feel that he has someone to talk to, and the rappresentative he’s talking to has to remember that the customer is a human being, and not a sale.

The life and death of CX

According to Wikipedia:

In commerce, customer experience (CX) is the product of an interaction between an organisation and a customer over the duration of their relationship. This interaction includes a customer’s attraction, awareness, discovery, cultivation, advocacy and purchase and use of a service. It is measured by the individual’s experience during all points of contact against the individual’s expectations.

It is a very common error to think that a customer’s experience with a service provider or a producer lives only during the moments the customer actually gets in contact with the company for the acquisition or assistance.

Author: Shay Stibelman

Digital marketing consultant in Milan, Italy. Born in Israel, raised in Germany by Russian parents.

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